Yoga

Tommy Rosen: Recovery 2.0: Yoga and Meditation for People in Recovery From Addiction

Addiction is a disease of “lack.” At the core level, we feel something is missing and we set out to try to fill the void through a set of behaviors that leave us further depleted. We damage the systems of our body and sap ourselves of “life force.” Our endocrine system gets taxed. Our nervous system is overworked. We live in nearly constant fight or flight, bringing on the horrible consequences of stress.

In my opinion, the 12 steps provide a wonderful path to overcome acute addiction. They work almost always, I think, if you put your energy and focus into them. The great promise they delivered to me was that the desire to do drugs and alcohol was removed altogether. That’s a HUGE statement, a miracle really. Yet, there are three important things that the 12 steps do not address: body, breath and diet. Interestingly, these three things are the irreplaceable building blocks, the essential amino acids if you will, for a stronger recovery and a more successful, enjoyable life.

Think of recovery as a multi-tiered process in which different people need different things at different times. If a person is mired in acute addiction to any of the big five — drugs, alcohol, food, sex or money — then that must be dealt with first. That is where Recovery 1.0 or the 12 steps come in. A person has to detoxify first. One must have a community to support the epic and imminent transformation that takes place in early recovery. After some time, and this varies from person to person, one’s energy and “frequency” rises up and permits the practice of yoga, breath work and meditation. This is where Recovery 2.0 comes in. This is a great benchmark on the path of recovery, and if taken with intention, awareness and proper guidance from a mentor or teacher, one has the opportunity to make a lot of progress.

I do not feel that yoga and meditation are optional for people in recovery. Life will simply be better with practice than without it. Of course, one can stay sober without yoga and meditation. It’s just that if you want to lift yourself up out of the energy of addiction and break through to a new level of strength and awareness, one will have to adopt a practice that continues the detoxification process on a much deeper level.

I learned the hard way what it means to be sober while still stuck in the energy of addiction. I had put the drugs and alcohol down, but other addictions, stresses and dis-ease plagued me for many years into my recovery. It was not until I found Kundalini Yoga and gained a deeper understanding of Vinyasa that I began to re-claim my self and break through the force field of addiction perhaps for the first time in my life.

Here I am now 11 years later. I teach people in recovery how to apply these tools to their lives so that they, too, can experience the freedom that was given to me by my teacher, Guru Prem, and these amazing practices he shared with me.

On Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. at Golden Bridge Yoga in Santa Monica, I teach Yoga and Recovery. We do one hour of yoga and then circle up to have a one-hour 12-step meeting where everyone is welcome. We will see more and more of this I feel, as people realize the tremendous benefit of yoga as a cornerstone of one’s recovery path.

if you or anyone you know has been touched by addiction and are interested in exploring what Recovery 2.0 has to offer, connect with me here.

Please leave comments here below so we can be more connected. I would love to have a better sense of who you are and what your recovery journey is like.

With Love and Gratitude,

Tommy Rosen

I just released the first two titles in the Recovery 2.0 DVD series to help people who struggle with addiction of all kinds. These first two Recovery 2.0 DVDs bring together some of my most cherished yoga sets and meditations. There is an amazing soundtrack featuring the uplifting music of Aykanna and Earthrise Soundsystem. These practices are accessible to most people who have detoxed off of drugs and alcohol. They have made a huge difference in my life and I hope they will for you, too.

Need help with substance abuse or mental health issues? In the U.S., call 800-662-HELP (4357) for the SAMHSA National Helpline.

via Tommy Rosen: Recovery 2.0: Yoga and Meditation for People in Recovery From Addiction.

Meditation classes calming young minds | Illawarra Mercury

There seems to be a misconception that kids have it easy.

While they might not be worried about work or money, there are plenty of other things that can stress them out – relationships with their friends, bullying, school work and family issues are high up on the list of things children worry about.

Which is where meditation comes in.

It can help kids find a calm place when they feel anxious and help them to become peaceful after spending an afternoon running around the playground.

Lyn-Maree Fredericks started taking her two daughters to a children’s meditation class 18 months ago, after they started asking questions about her own meditation practices.

Although her eldest daughter no longer attends the classes, she still meditates regularly at home to overcome stress around school, while her nine-year-old daughter Jessie still loves meditating with her friends every Tuesday afternoon.

“Jessie is in tune with the relaxation side of it. I find the conversations I have with her leaving here are usually very clear, like she can go in concerned with what’s happened at school but come out quite bubbly and relaxed,” Fredericks says.

“She seems to find clarity with life. It means she is clearer in the things she wants to do.”

Jessie says she uses meditation to deal with things she worries about at school and to help calm her mind before she falls asleep.

“I like it because it’s fun and very relaxing to do. I like doing the guided meditation the most. Sometimes it’s hard to do just on your own.”

“I do it at night because it helps me get to sleep and with school and calming down with tests that might be coming up.”

Ursula Laughton runs a children’s meditation class and says most kids tell her it assists them when they are feeling anxious about something at school.

“There’s always pressures, even from age five they’ve already started school, and there’s expectations and responsibilities that they have to experience and deal with everyday, so taking this time out, they get the opportunity to be themselves, reflect on what they need and get to know themselves more,” she says.

“I’ve had comments about children being able to go to school more at ease, relating with their peers with more confidence.”

The difference between teaching a child and an adult how to meditate is the level of intellectual engagement they have with the process.

A typical meditation class begins with the children expressing something they are grateful for, followed by some stretches and breathing exercises to calm them down. Laughton then guides her students through some relaxation exercises before taking them into their imagination using visualisation, which lasts between five and 10 minutes depending how old the children are.

via Meditation classes calming young minds | Illawarra Mercury.

 

Meditation for the business soul | Dynamic Business – Small Business Advice – Forums | Dynamic Business Australia

Marina Yang | April 26, 2013

Meditation is about understanding yourself and where you fit into the world. What better practice for the working person?

The trials of navigating the muddy waters of workplace relationships whilst trying to improve your own productivity are lifted when you understand who you are, and where you are. Meditation can also improve your self-perception by boosting self-esteem and confidence.

The clarity of a mind used to meditation is the result of refining your ability to focus and move from one concept to another, and can therefore assist with problem-solving.

Some simple tips for meditation beginners:

1. Find and allocate time for meditation at least once a day.

Meditation is an accumulative process. A single sitting might make you feel at peace for a while, but continuous meditation can improve your general wellbeing. Find time during your day for meditation, and sustain it. Ideally, work should not be a source of stress- meditation can help you overcome anxieties associated with work by bolstering your mental state. Soon you will fall into a rhythm and enjoy being able to wake up feeling energised, and going to sleep feeling at peace.

2. Position

Assume a comfortable position in a quiet space without distractions. The lotus position is a classic, but any upright seated position is good. Try not to lean against anything or lie down to avoid becoming drowsy. In this position, try to stop thinking consciously and let your mind sink down into a more abstract place. Feel rather than think. Focus on the physical feeling of your body- the weight of your limbs, the sensation of the floor or chair beneath you, the movement of the air, and your own pulse.

A popular technique is to concentrate on the sensation of the toes on your left foot, then the rest of the foot, then the ankle. Keep progressing around the body, thinking about the feeling of each part of your body. End at the top of your skull.

This will help you become more comfortable in your own body and aware of how you position yourself. Is your mind fully engaged with each part of your physical body at all times? Are you entirely aware of how you move? Sometimes, unfocused people will blatantly but unconsciously drift off and this will show in their body language. Avoid this by improving your concentration skills and closely establishing the link between mind and body.

3. Breathing

Focussing on breathing is one of the most basic meditative exercises. Count your breaths and establish a rhythm. Count ‘one’ as you breathe in, then ‘two’ as you exhale. Feel the air flowing into your expanding lungs, then flowing back out.

Alternately, imagine your worries being ‘breathed out’ and that you are breathing in positivity. Some people like to visualise- your worries might appear as a dark mass, whilst the positivity in the world could be a bright, warm light.

It is also recommended that before you start meditating, you write down all of your problems and the things associated with them on a piece of paper, which helps with the process of sweeping the negativity from your mind.

This should help you form a more optimistic mindset and more confidence in yourself, whilst reducing stress levels. The problems cannot be erased, but you can gain a better understanding of what they are, where they originate from, and how you can approach them. Your business and work will be where you left them, but you can return them as a rejuvenated person with a fresh outlook.

via Meditation for the business soul | Dynamic Business – Small Business Advice – Forums | Dynamic Business Australia.

 

Yoga Isn’t Just Good For Your Mind, It’s Good For Your Genes | Greatist

There are lots of reasons to start practicing yoga and meditation. Yogis get to shop at Lululemon and tote around fancy rolled-up mats. Those who meditate attract admiring looks when they sit poised in lotus position in the middle of a crowded office building.

Okay, so we’re being a bit facetious. But, as it turns out, the om-and-down-dog crowd may be doing more than just jumping on the latest trend. Multiple studies released over the last few months provide solid evidence that yoga and meditation can undo the serious damage that stress wreaks on our bodies. At a time when many Americans report high levels of stress, these findings are a good reason for healthcare professionals to start recommending these techniques on a regular basis.

What’s the Deal?

In one recent study, researchers recruited a small group of newbie meditators and trained them for six weeks in the art of breathing deeply, repeating mantras, and ignoring intrusive thoughts. At the end of the training, researchers drew blood before and 15 minutes after participants listened to a 20-minute guided meditation CD. What they found was remarkable: All the blood samples showed positive changes in gene expression the process by which certain genes are turned “on” or “off”.

Specifically, genes linked to energy metabolism, mitochondria function, insulin secretion, and telomere maintenance were activated, while genes associated with stress and inflammation were deactivated. Researchers also ran the same experiment on a group of more experienced meditators, and found that the pros’ blood samples showed even more significant, positive changes in gene expression.Other recent research has yielded similar findings. Scientists have found that yoga induces changes in the expression of genes related to the immune system in other words, yoga may boost immunity, and that practicing yoga and meditation can help the body heal faster from disease [1] [2].

Why It MattersAt the same time that scientists have been finding that yoga and meditation can cause changes at the cellular level, other researchers have shown how chronic stress can cause long-term physiological and psychological damage. In studies, mice that have high levels of cortisol the stress hormone also show weakened immune systems. Presumably, these findings may apply to humans as well. [3].  And people who report high levels of stress in their daily lives are more likely to experience chronic health conditions and/or psychological disorders down the line [4] [5].

The implications of both these areas of research are huge. As many as 20 percent of Americans say they experience extreme stress and many don’t know where to turn for help. Yoga and meditation provide a scientifically-backed, highly practical way to help manage some of this stress before it does lasting damage to our minds and bodies. We’re not talking about a huge lifestyle change, either. In the most recent study, blood samples showed changes in gene expression after participants meditated for just 20 minutes albeit after spending some time learning proper yoga and meditation techniques.

The good news is that it’s likely some of the most stressed people are already yogis and/or meditators. As of 2012, more than 20 million Americans practiced yoga, and more than half said they practice for stress relief. At the same time, in 2011, more than six million Americans were advised to practice alternative mind-body therapies by their healthcare provider [6].All this research provides convincing evidence for making yoga and meditation something healthcare professionals recommend on a regular basis. Other possibilities include workplace interventions that focus on teaching yoga and meditation techniques. With any luck, at some point these practices won’t even be considered “alternative” anymore.

Do you practice yoga and or meditation regularly? What are your motivations? Let us know in the comments below or tweet the author at @ShanaDLebowitz.

via Yoga Isn’t Just Good For Your Mind, It’s Good For Your Genes | Greatist.

 

Mary Pritchard: But I Don’t Have Time to Meditate

Yes, you do. Time isn’t the issue; it’s priority, and specifically prioritizing yourself. I learned this the hard way this past week.

For those of you on an academic schedule, you know that once spring break is over, crunch time begins. The first thing that usually goes for me during crunch time is any type of self-care. Keep in mind that I know I need my daily meditation and yoga to be able to do what I do effectively. Doesn’t matter. I think to myself, “It will free up so much time if I just give up ______.” In reality, it won’t.

Without my yoga and meditation, I become a tense, anxiety-prone mess. I get cranky. I don’t sleep as well because I spend more time at night worrying, which only perpetuates the problem. So all the time I “saved” turns into time burned, wasted doing something completely non-productive, like worrying and list making.

Ah yes, I am the queen of list making. You might think, “List making is good, right? It helps you prioritize what you need to do.” Sadly, no. List making, for me, only leads to more list making as I start putting stupid things down that really don’t need to be listed like “brush my teeth,” “check my email,” or “go to work.” Duh! Those are things I’d be doing anyway. And when I put something really important for my mental health on my list like “meditate,” I ignore it and keep on jotting things down that I should be doing that either aren’t important or I would do them anyway with or without the list reminder.

So let’s talk priorities. To make meditation and yoga part of my day, I have come to realize that I need to do three things:

1) Figure out why it’s so important that I meditate. (Hint: It can’t be “because I should.” That never works.) It should be a personal reason for you that you know without a doubt to be true. Something like, “I’m calmer,” “I make better decisions,” or “I sleep better.”

2) Put it in your schedule — pretend meditation/yoga/exercise/whatever your self-care thing is is a very important doctor’s appointment or meeting at work. Something you know you would never make an excuse to miss. Treat it like that appointment. Make it sacred. And be specific: When are you going to do it? For how long? Another tip: Start small. If you haven’t been taking care of yourself for a while, saying you are going to devote an hour a day to meditate is not realistic. Start with five minutes or one minute or six breaths. Once you can do that, start upping the time gradually. The last time I fell off the meditation wagon, I restarted at five minutes. I was up to 16.5 minutes when I fell off the wagon last week. Will I start back at five minutes? Probably not. As it’s only been a week, 10-15 min is feasible for me. But start where you are, and if where you are is nowhere then start with 30 seconds or one minute — whatever you think you actually can make time to do on a consistent basis.

3) Have a Plan B — I know exactly why I stopped meditating. I had figured out for myself that the very best time for me to meditate was first thing in the morning before anyone else in my house got up. Then one morning my husband was up before I was. There went my morning meditation. Then it happened again. Pretty soon an entire week had gone by and I only meditated once. Can I blame my husband for disrupting my schedule? No. That only happened on those two occasions anyway. Besides, it wasn’t his fault that he couldn’t sleep; it was my fault for not having a Plan B. So here’s the thing. Life happens. Sometimes Plan A will fail, and if you don’t have a Plan B, you will likely fall off the track. So my new Plan B: My Plan A still holds. My meditation will occur first thing in the morning while everyone else is still in bed, but if for some reason that does not happen, I will immediately reschedule my meditation — preferably for some time during that same day: at lunch, right before dinner, or at bedtime. I will allow myself to shorten the duration if need be. Five minutes is better than no minutes, but I will do it.

Okay, moral of the story: You’ve got to make time for yourself — preferably every day — to do something that refreshes you, centers you, and keeps you grounded. For me that something is meditation. It might be something else for you. That’s okay. The point is: You need to figure out what it is and why you’re doing it, and then schedule it in. Right now. That’s right, take your planner out and schedule it in just like you would a doctor’s appointment. Vow to honor that time you’ve set aside for yourself. If life happens (which it sometimes will), that’s okay, but immediately reschedule your self-care appointment. Otherwise we both know what will happen: It won’t.

For more by Mary Pritchard, Ph.D., click here.

For more on meditation, click here.

via Mary Pritchard: But I Don’t Have Time to Meditate.

Rebecca Lammersen: Silencing the Myth of Meditation: You Don’t Have to Sit Still to Be Present

“I can do this. Just 20 minutes. Just sit still. My shoulder itches. Stop thinking about it! My foot is falling asleep, almost numb. The numbness is always the opening act for the pins and needles. That would be a good name for a band, The Pins and Needles, and here they come, singing right up my leg. I’ve never been able to decide whether moving helps them go away faster or just makes it worse. I think I should go get more yogurt cups for the girls at Trader Joe’s. Oh, and I need more apples too. Okay, my shoulder really itches now, I’ve got to itch it. Just breathe a little longer. Speaking of, how long has it been? Don’t look, don’t do it!”

I peel my upper lid from my lower lid, just enough so no one will notice, even though the only living creature nearby is a quail squatting outside my door, and I doubt he can see past his beak.

“Really? It’s only been two minutes? Who am I meditating for? Why would I care if someone sees me open my eyes? I feel defeated. I can’t even sit for two minutes without a full chorus of complaints and to-dos.”

This is how it used to be.

For 10 years, I struggled my way through every meditation. I had the desire and the discipline, yet I couldn’t seem to be anywhere, but elsewhere.

A few years ago, I began asking the question, Why? Why do I meditate? and Why can’t I meditate? From the why came the how: How do I meditate?

Meditation is a science — the science of understanding the pathways of the brain and how they react to different situations, experiences and stimuli. Through this understanding, we can learn how to respond to these reactions and train the brain to focus.

Before we can have a purposeful meditation and yoga practice, we must first become a scientist fluent in the physics of the practice. It is impossible to bepresent in stillness for any amount of time without knowing how our brain functions.

Until we aquire this knowledge, sitting is ineffective — a waste of time, and detrimental to our well being due to the unnecessary pressure and expectation that breeds from our naiveté.

“Practice and all is coming.”

These are the wise words of the late Pattabhi Jois, the master of Ashtanga. I agree, as long as there is a method to the practice and guidance of the method.

Practice may bring a mastery that mimics perfection, but practice also creates suffering if one does not know what they are doing and why they are doing it.

Attempting to sit in meditation without learned technique is comparable to placing a 2-year-old on the floor of the NYSE and expecting him to navigate the system on his own while conducting the trades for the day.

Chaos amidst chaos. Chaos causes more chaos. My favorite description of enlightenment is, “Enlightenment is learning not to make more struggle of the existing struggle.”

In this situation, not making more struggle would be grooming and teaching a person how to traverse the trading floor with grace, discerning the viable trades within the noise and creating a profit.

Meditation is the same. We learn how the brain operates, cultivating the tools to manage it, before we sit down to listen to it. The profit bestowed to an educated meditator is a contented life, with an abundance of efficiency, discernment and intention. We respond more and react less, because we (the mind) have learned how to direct the brain as it keeps the trading floor open all day, every day.

The brain is the NYSE, the mind is the trader.

The brain and the mind are two separate parts, as are the spirit and the soul. In order for them to work synergistically, they must be studied separately, understood individually and then, connected together.

Before we can be present in stillness, we may want to learn how to be present in action.

The other day, a woman approached me, and in one stressed breath she asked: “My friend told me you are a yoga teacher, and I’ve always wanted to meditate and be present, and I just want to learn how, how can I meditate?”

I asked, “You probably already do and you don’t even know it. What do you love to do that calms you?”

Her face relaxed and she replied quietly, “I like to run. I can hear myself breathe. I feel my feet and I notice my surroundings.”

“So you see? You already meditate. Just do it more, in other facets of your life. Turn any chore or repetitive action into a sensory overload, and see if you can separate each sense from the other. For example, when I vacuum, I am only vacuuming. I pay attention to the feel of the handle in my hand. The vibration and hum as I turn it on, how the vacuum resists as it stumbles across a crumb on the carpet, and the sound of the crumb as it is chewed inside the canister.

“I am completely there, in the experience, hearing, feeling, seeing — sensing. I am fixating my brain on a task as my mind remains concentrated in the experience. I extract myself from my surroundings, so that I may be in it, being in it, is being present.”

Her response began with a sigh of relief. “Oh my gosh, I can totally do that.”

“Yes you can,” I encouraged.

The “how to” begins with attention — paying attention and educating ourselves about the mechanics of the brain. That’s it.

Before we can sit still and meditate like a monk in a Nepalese cave, we need to learn how bathe within ourselves, in the active moment, without thinking of the next action.

This is presence, being present and I think it may even be a little something “they” like to call enlightenment.

Rebecca Lammersen: Silencing the Myth of Meditation: You Don’t Have to Sit Still to Be Present.

 

Meditation as Art: “The Sacred Shadow Self” – Creating Sacred Space – Sketches

Here are the final architectural sketches for The Sacred Shadow Self light and shadow installation June 2013 at Mind Unwind Gallery:

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See how it turns out at Mind Unwind this June!

Part of my great joy in making art is seeing how ideas end up manifesting as they change and adapt to different circumstances. Hope you’ll come play with your sacred shadow self!

-Karah Pino, MAcOM, Artist

media: paper, light, refractions and shadows 

performance: mindfulness, qigong, yoga, chanting, singing bowls,

and other meditative arts

“The Sacred Shadow Self” is an interactive art installation including live meditation performances opening June 2013 at Mind Unwind Gallery ~ West Seattle.

~Still looking for QiGong, Yoga and other Meditation Performers!!~

To join in meditation, please fill out the form at the end of the Artist Statement.

“We are all a precious child of creator and as such our shadow is also a sacred part of our selves as the precious children of the holy people our ancestors in the context of the natural order in the universe.” 

Patricia Anne Davis, Navajo Wisdom Keeper

“Unwinding the Mind” Meditation Technique: Responding creatively to stress by Karah Pino, MAcOM

Responding creatively to stress.

Instead of reacting to situations with our old  instincts, we can learn to respond thoughtfully and creatively. When we practice observing our own reactions, we can better understand the nature of our old instinctual patterns.  After allowing our initial, instinctive reaction to pass by,  we then have more time to choose how to respond with intention and care.

The experience of being in a meditative state is one of calmness, peacefulness and a sense of well-being.  After meditating, this sense of well-being will continue for a half a day (or until the next stressful event).  Research has shown that 20 minutes of meditation can lower cortisol stress hormone levels for 12 hours.  This helps us to understand why meditation traditions around the world encourage meditation twice a day!

After meditating regularly, you will find that you are able to regain your calm more and more easily after a stressful event.  You will also find that the feeling of peace gives your creative mind more space to find solutions to problems and this leads to less worry because you begin to trust in your abilities more and more.

Download this guided meditation for free:

20 minute Guided Meditation: Observation of the Breath MP3

Watching our thoughts and feelings as children on the playground of our imagination.

Unwind your Mind

Meditation Instruction and CD

Know as children know, that these thoughts and feelings are temporary.  Know that you are free to leave the playground game sat any time.  Watch as the spinning wheels and grinding gears slow to a stop.  Feel the peaceful stillness of a mind unwound.

Karah Pino, MAcOM is the creator and instructor of Unwind your Mind, a meditation course designed to help you discover for yourself the benefits of meditation and choose the style best suited to you.

 

Gabrielle Bernstein: A Meditation for Manifesting

In this video I teach a Kundalini meditation called “Purify the Subtle Body.” The subtle body is the part of us that calls in opportunities, brings us good news and attracts positivity toward us. This meditation strengthens your energy field so that you become a magnet for miracles. Practicing this meditation will make you shine bright and deepen your connection to the universe.

In the video I break down the meditation and guide you along with the music. For further clarification, please see the instructions below. If you have a shoulder issue and cannot lift your arms overhead, simply envision yourself doing the exercise and you’ll receive the same benefit from the meditation. Feel free to leave questions or remarks in the comments below.
Mudra: Sitting in easy pose (cross-legged) with a straight spine, place the arms down by the sides, backs of the palms on the ground next to the sides of the body.

Movement: As you inhale, raise the arms over the head, until the two palms overlap a few inches above the your head (known as the tenth gate). The right hand will be a few inches above the head. The left palm will lie flat on top of the back of the right hand. The thumbs do NOT touch. (Note: Yogi Bhajan very specifically keeps the thumbs separated when the hands overlap over the top of the head.)

Breath: Make your mouth into an “O.” Inhale through the “O” as you raise the arms over the head, and exhale through the “O” as you lower the hands back down to the ground.

Chant: The “Tantric Har” music, which is played in the video. On the first “Har” raise your arms up. On the second “Har” your arms go down. Continue in this rhythmic movement. Pull in on the navel and the diaphragm as you do the movement.

Time: If you’re new to Kundalini meditation, begin with three minutes. If you want to go big, then practice this meditation for 11 minutes a day.

End: Inhale deeply. Immediately interlace the hands over the head, elbows straight, and begin to deeply stretch the body right to left, and left to right, without letting go of the hands.

Continue as you hold the breath for 15 seconds. Exhale. Repeat three times total. Relax.

Gabrielle Bernstein: A Meditation for Manifesting.

 

B.R.E.A.T.H.E: The Neuroscience of Breathing Techniques TED talk

This is an extra long TED talk by Neuroscientist Alan Watkins talking about how to “Be Brilliant Every Single Day”.

In the second half he talks about how breathing techniques work physiologically.  He mentions that there are 12 different ways that the breath can be adjusted, but only talked about the most important three:

  1. Rhythmically
  2. Smoothly
  3. Location of the focus during the breath (in the center of the chest)

To remember this, Dr Watkins uses the acronym B.R.E.A.T.H.E:

  • Breathe
  • Regularly
  • Through the
  • Heart
  • Everyday

He also shows a graph which describes two variances of experience, one being the Sympathetic (flight/fight) neurological pattern and the Parasympathetic (rest/digest) pattern.  His explanation about how where we are on that trajectory is less important than the Negative (cortisol driven) emotional system vs. the Positive (DHEA driven) emotional system trajectory was quite fascinating.

He explains that we can use breathing techniques to bring us to the center of the Negative/Positive Emotional system, but that to be optimal we need to be able to regulate our emotional state and stay in the positive.  This makes sense to me as a meditation instructor because the breathing techniques are so often used in conjunction with deeper emotionally based meditation techniques such as METTA meditation, Tonglen and other methods of training ourselves to emote love and peace.

Download a free Meditation Track from Unwind your Mind here.