Arts

Rethinking origami as ‘Folding Paper’ / Sacramento Press

Miri Golan’s “Two Books,” (left) and Vincent Floderer’s “Clitocybe” (right)

If you think of frogs or birds when someone mentions origami, then perhaps you need to visit the new exhibit, “Folding Paper: the Infinite Possibilities of Origami,” at the Crocker Art Museum, where you’ll see some frogs and some birds, but you’ll also see pieces created by artists from around the globe that go far beyond what’s taught in elementary school.

How about a dress that can be worn standing up, and a matching pair of shoes? Each item was created from a single sheet of parchment paper, without making any cuts. If a parchment dress isn’t to your liking, perhaps a red dress created from a more traditional dress fabric will suit you for that special evening out.

Origami inspires clothing and telescopes (Image by: David Alvarez)

What do dresses have to do with origami? Well, as this exhibit shows, the art of folding paper touches many aspects of daily life, including clothing, buildings, maps and even phone designs.

You won’t want to rush through this exhibit because the lighting is as important as each piece. Watch how the shadows play on Bernie Peyton’s “Frog on a Leaf,” which reminded me of a haiku. Move in close, to the left, to the right, then step back and see how the light shifts, allowing some parts to come forward and others to recede.

One of the most important pieces in the exhibit is Miri Golan’s “Two Books,” which have tiny people figures emerging from the Koran and the Torah. The tiny figures, which appear to be worshipping, come together in peace.

As surprising as the parchment dress is the array of materials used to create these objects. While some artists worked with traditional materials, others, like Giang Dinh, chose to use watercolor paper, as Dinh does for his piece “Fly.”

“Fly” by Giang Dinh, 2010, watercolor paper (Image by: David Alvarez)

Spheres created by artists from Poland, Japan and Germany incorporated metallic paper, ticker tape, paper tape and even copy paper, while Robert J. Lang used glassine paper for his piece, “3 7 Hyperbole Limit, Opus 600,” one of few relatively flat pieces in the exhibit.

The tiniest piece in the exhibit is a crane folded from a candy wrapper. Be sure to take time to read about Sadako Sasaki and how she came to fold this crane, if you do not already know her story.

What should you not miss? The film showing speed folding; Lang’s giclee prints of the crease patterns he used in creating “Bull Moose,” “Scorpion,” and “Red-Tailed Hawk”; the story of the impact of origami on science and industry; and the history of origami, including information about Akira Yoshizawa, who became known as Japan’s first origami fine artist.

Robert J. Lang’s “Scorpion” and “Red-Tailed Hawk” and giclee prints of crease patterns. (Image by: David Alvarez)

This exhibit, curated by Meher McArthur, opened Sunday, June 30, and runs through September 29. To complement the exhibit, the Crocker Art Museum is offering several special events for adults and children. Please visit the museum’s website for more information.

Sacramento Press / Rethinking origami as ‘Folding Paper’.

 

Meditation as Art: “The Sacred Shadow Self” – Creating Sacred Space – Sketches

Here are the final architectural sketches for The Sacred Shadow Self light and shadow installation June 2013 at Mind Unwind Gallery:

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See how it turns out at Mind Unwind this June!

Part of my great joy in making art is seeing how ideas end up manifesting as they change and adapt to different circumstances. Hope you’ll come play with your sacred shadow self!

-Karah Pino, MAcOM, Artist

media: paper, light, refractions and shadows 

performance: mindfulness, qigong, yoga, chanting, singing bowls,

and other meditative arts

“The Sacred Shadow Self” is an interactive art installation including live meditation performances opening June 2013 at Mind Unwind Gallery ~ West Seattle.

~Still looking for QiGong, Yoga and other Meditation Performers!!~

To join in meditation, please fill out the form at the end of the Artist Statement.

“We are all a precious child of creator and as such our shadow is also a sacred part of our selves as the precious children of the holy people our ancestors in the context of the natural order in the universe.” 

Patricia Anne Davis, Navajo Wisdom Keeper

Reaching for the Better Angels of our Nature – Art Installation by Karah Pino, MAcOM

Reaching for the Better Angels of our Nature - #Artpocalypse @Mind Unwind December 2012 l Installation by Karah Pino

#Artpocalypse @Mind Unwind December 2012 Installation by Karah Pino

I began this piece with the idea that our better nature, the nature of humanity in harmony with the natural world, is just a decision away.  All we have to do is reach for the truth in ourselves.

Artwalk December 13th, 2012 at Mind Unwind Gallery in West Seattle.  “Artpocalypse” happening all day December 21st, 2012

Mixed Media “Chime”delier
Vellum Origami Folded Angels
Oil Paint on Industrial Scrap Plastic sheets
Indian Brass Bells

Installation Photo Gallery:

Roosted in the Angels NestThe Light that Shines WithinAwakening to the Gentle Chimes Our own Clarion Call

Reaching for the Better Angels of our Nature – #Artpocalypse December 2012 Final Installation by Karah Pino

Each angel with bell and blessing $120.  
$20 to the artist and $100 to the Mind Unwind Foundation bringing vital Creative Arts programs into local schools and Community Centers in partnership with other local Creative Arts programs.  The Creative Arts are the foundation of natural learning and critical thinking, building the capacity for developing life skills including math and science .

Origami Artist, Karah Pino graduated from the University of Washington with a BA in Interdisciplinary Visual Art in 1998 with experience in Jewelry and other Metalworking, digital production, graphic design, and paper arts.  She is currently an Artists in Residence at Mind Unwind Gallery,  teaching paper arts to children and meditation to adults with a focus on Origami and Creative Collaborations!