Paper

Swiss Artist’s Installation: Folding a Life-Size Origami Elephant Out of a Single Sheet of Paper

Folding a Life-Size Origami Elephant Out of a Single Sheet of Paper  

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Swiss artist Sipho Mabona will use the template for this origami elephant to create a life-size version.
Courtesy of Sipho Mabona

Origami has always been an artform that’s fun to watch. But now one Swiss artist is attempting to elevate the concept of origami as performance art with an Indiegogo campaign to help him realize his whimsical ambition to fold a life-size elephant from a single sheet of paper.

The Lucerne-based Sipho Mabona folded his first paper airplane at age 5 and has since made a career producing stunning origami animalsroses, human figures, and insects, among other more abstract creations. He has shown his work and taught origami workshops around the world.

Now the 33-year-old artist is appealing to Indiegogo’s crowdfunding angels to help him realize his ambition of folding a life-size elephant out of a single sheet of 50-by-50 foot paper.* (So far he’s raised $13,843 of his $24,000 goal with three weeks to go.) Mabona says his aim is to show what a single sheet of paper can do by using it to create a replica of one of the world’s most imposing land-dwelling creatures.

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A crease pattern used to fold the elephant took a month to work out.
Courtesy of Sipho Mabona

Mabona told me by phone that he developed the pattern for the elephant in about a month, a process that was sped up by having already worked out how to make patterns for origami tigers, bears, and rhinos. He said that his process is a combination of precise geometry and artistic intuition. To make a work of origami, he makes all the folds in the paper before refolding along the crease lines to assemble a finished 3-D object. The beauty of a piece of paper with intricate crease lines has also inspired him to produce crease patterns as wall art and ceramic plates.

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The crease pattern used to make the elephant is a work of art in its own right.
Courtesy of Sipho Mabona

The artist said that this is the most ambitious project he has ever attempted. “I’ve never folded anything larger than 6-by-6 meters [20-by-20 feet],” Mabona said. “But in principle the whole folding part stays pretty much the same. I’m not too worried about the beginning, the folding of the base. But the transitions, the shaping of the body and making it three dimensional—that’s what I’m worried about.”

Mabona expects the process will take about two weeks. The project will require three assistants and the elephant will be shored up by an aluminum frame and sealed with white acrylic paint. He plans to set up in a local art venue and provide a live online video stream of the process. If all goes well, he hopes to repeat the performance in other venues.

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Swiss artist Sipho Mabona with a baby elephant
Courtesy of Sipho Mabona

Check out this video to learn more about the project and for a glimpse of the giant crease pattern that will be used to make the elephant.

*Correction, Dec. 16, 2013: This post originally misstated the dimension of the paper being used to make the elephant. It is 50-by-50 feet, not meters.

 

Kristin Hohenadel is a writer and editor whose work has appeared in the New York Times,Fast CompanyVogueElle DecorLonny, and Apartment Therapy.

SEED of Origami

Millbrook kids to bring frogs to S.E.E.D., as in origami

STAFF PHOTO BY ROB NOVIT
McKintley Morgan, a Millbrook Elemetentary School fourth-grader, completes her origami frog. She and her classmates will show other kids how to make the paper frogs at the upcoming Science Education Enrichment Day (S.E.E.D.), scheduled at USC Aiken on Saturday, Oct. 12.
STAFF PHOTO BY ROB NOVIT McKintley Morgan, a Millbrook Elemetentary School fourth-grader, completes her origami frog. She and her classmates will show other kids how to make the paper frogs at the upcoming Science Education Enrichment Day (S.E.E.D.), scheduled at USC Aiken on Saturday, Oct. 12.
More than two dozen frogs were hopping all over Karey Santos’ fourth-grade classroom at Millbrook Elementary School last week.

OK, the frogs are made of paper – origami frogs, actually, that the students will bring to the Science Education Enrichment Day (S.E.E.D.) at USC Aiken on Saturday, Oct. 12.

That event will attract more than 3,000 people from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nearly 70 exhibitors – ranging from Savannah River Site staffers, businesses and other organizations — will provide an array of interactive activities. Santos in the past has brought nine-year-olds to serve as exhibitors and is delighted to do so again.

Converting sheets of paper into hopping frogs demands some intricate folding, yet the process is even more involved. The children created large frogs and much smaller “peepers,” pressing down a flap on each frog to send it flying more or less through the air.

McKintley Morgan and the majority of her classmates thought the smaller frogs would go farther, and they were right.

“The smaller frogs are lighter, and the weight made a big difference,” McKintley said.

The kids had other assignments with the project — measuring distances to one-eighth of an inch, plotting the results and determining the mode, mean and median, getting experience with geometry and vocabulary, Santos said.

Her students will get a chance to see all the other exhibits. In two-hour shifts, they also will show other kids how to create an origami frog and test how far it can leap. In addition, they will introduce leaf-rubbing and demonstrate how pantometers are used for measuring angles.

Senior writer Rob Novit is the Aiken Standard’s education reporter and has been with the newspaper since September 2001.

Read more: Millbrook kids to bring frogs to S.E.E.D., as in origami | Aiken Standard

Geometric origami inspiration | Brooklyn Bride – Modern Wedding Blog

Geometric origami inspiration

teal-peach-geometric-wedding-54

I’ve been spotting geometric origami projects left and right and there’s no better place to use them than in a modern wedding reception. Try a bunch of them as centerpieces for a a table, or hanging overhead as lanterns. Or create a pattern out of paper and adhere them to a wall. There are so many ways to use them and they add a clean, fresh vibe to the event.

Top  centerpieces

Middle left 2D heart hanging  |  Middle right gold hanging 

bottom left hanging lanterns  |  Bottom right hangings

by Brittany Watson Jepsen of The House That Lars Built

Geometric origami inspiration | Brooklyn Bride – Modern Wedding Blog.

 

Author tells stories with origami | Schools | Warren County News

Topics: Schools
Author tells stories with origami

MAINEVILLE, OH (FOX19) – Students at Little Miami elementary and primary schools learned the ancient art of origami recently when children’s author Christine Petrell Kallevig brought “Storigami” to their buildings.

Kallevig, who has written a number of children’s stories, used paper folding illustrate a number of stories she shared with students in Butlerville, Maineville and Salem Twp. schools. Students learned how to fold paper cranes and even how to make them “flap.”

Kallevig’s visit was sponsored by the PTOs of each building.

Topics: Schools

Author tells stories with origami | Schools | Warren County News.

 

Top Origami Artist to Shed Light on Modern Science of Origami at May 22 Talk

Robert Lang

To many of us, origami, the ancient Japanese art of paper-folding, is an artistic novelty, resulting in a cute miniature crane, frog, elephant or even a boat or a box. But, according to origami master Robert Lang, the algorithms and theorems of origami design have illuminated long-standing mathematical questions and have even solved practical engineering problems.

Lang, who is recognized as one of the foremost origami artists in the world, as well as a pioneer in computational origami and the development of formal design algorithms for folding, will give a free public talk, From Flapping Birds to Space Telescopes: the Modern Science of Origami from 2 to 3:30 p.m., May 22 in Geisel Library’s Science & Engineering Events Room. The lecture is the last in a series of origami-related events–which included origami instruction and screenings of the documentary Between the Folds–sponsored during spring quarter by UC San Diego’s Science & Engineering Library.

At his talk, Lang, who holds a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Caltech, will discuss the techniques used in mathematical origami design–ranging from the abstruse to the highly approachable–and will describe how geometric concepts led to the solution of a broad class of origami folding problems – specifically, the problem of efficiently folding a shape with an arbitrary number and arrangement of flaps. This paved the way for origami designs of mind-blowing complexity and realism, some of which will be examined during Lang’s lecture. As often happens in mathematics, theory originally developed for its own sake has led to some surprising practical applications, including safer airbags, said Lang.

Origami crab and crane

While working at NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Spectra Diode Laboratories, and JDS Uniphase, Lang authored or co-authored over 80 papers and 45 patents on lasers and optoelectronics and has authored, co-authored, or edited 14 books and a CD-ROM on origami. He is a full-time artist and consultant on origami and its applications to engineering problems but keeps his toes in the world of scientific publishing, most recently as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics from 2007–2010. Lang received Caltech’s highest honor, the Distinguished Alumni Award, in 2009 and in 2013 was elected as one of the inaugural Fellows of the American Mathematical Society.

After his lecture, which will include light refreshments, Lang will be on hand to sign copies of his books, two of which–Origami in Action and Origami Design Secrets will be available for purchase.

This event is supported by funding from IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). For more information: http://libguides.ucsd.edu/origami. To register for Lang’s lecture: http://tinyurl.com/lang-lecture-reg.

 

Sacred Shadow Studio Update #2: “Vitalize the Mind” wall panels

Artist at work Unwinding her Mind

Artist at work - Karah Pino, MAcOM

Artist at work – Karah Pino, MAcOM

I’m not sure why I insist on using my fingers when working with charcole…they always crack and bleed, but I am getting more savvy about using a Chamois…or paper towel in this case. — at Sacred Shadow Studio for the Mind Unwind June Exhibit.

“Vitalize the Mind” wall panels are 60″inch by 8 feet panels based on a Taoist Talisman from the 7th century.  The two panels will be flanking a permanent meditator carved from a column of light and the  shadow created by it on the wall..

Still need to figure out how to make the wall panels movable so the doors they will be hiding can be accessed easily.

Learn more about the Sacred Shadow Self exhibit,

an interactive art installation including live meditation performances and featuring two youth origami artists inspired by a 2-year-old, two young artists and a wise elder

by reading the complete Artist Statement:

Origami Shelter: Instant Flat-Pack Architecture on Demand | WebUrbanist

origamic architecture

Take a structure, strip away all of the non-essentials, and squeeze out every last unused bit of air space, and what do you get? Something a lot like a folded sheet of paper.

origami inspired instant architecture

This folding shelter designed by Doowon Suh is as elementary as it gets – a series of sheets that unfold like origami to form a robust but basic building.

origami example

Like nesting paper cranes, in its most compact form, each module can be stacked on its siblings, making it easy to pack and ship in containers or store until deployed.

origami flat pack buildings

The modules are bare bones for maximum adaptive capability – they can emergency homes or hospital pods, temporary stores or community rooms.

via Origami Shelter: Instant Flat-Pack Architecture on Demand | WebUrbanist.

Origami Invitational – All Youth Origami Artists Welcome to join in the June Exhibit at Mind Unwind Gallery

In celebration of two Featured Youth Origami Artists, the June Exhibition at Mind Unwind Gallery will include an Origami Invitational

All youth origami artists will be welcome to bring in and share their favorite pieces during the West Seattle Artwalk June 13th, 5pm-7pm.

Orange Origami shape

Blindfolded Origami maker

Included in the June exhibition called “The Sacred Shadow Self” will be a seascape of shadows made by large-scale Origami structures including an 11 foot Origami Albatross folded by 3rd grader Cole Durnwirth and an Origami Sea Anemone assembled by 3rd grader Caroline Byrne.

Please RSVP on Facebook or the Contact Form below, so we know how much space to make for sharing!

Video: The Art and Mathematics of Origami | CAST

Congratulations to Erik and Martin Demaine for their recent Guggenheim award!

“One of our growing realizations over the years is that mathematics itself is an art form, and I think that’s what attracted both of us to this area in the first place. [I]t has the same kind of creativity, the same kinds of aesthetics, that you get in art: You want a clean problem to solve, and you want an elegant solution to that problem. Both art and mathematics are about having the right ideas [and] executing those ideas in some convincing way, so in that sense they’re indistinguishable.” — Erik Demaine on the fusion of art and science.The Demaines’ curved-crease sculptures exemplify collaborative, cross-disciplinary exploration.

Finding origami to be a powerful tool to study mathematics, the father-and-son duo explore foldable forms from both mathematical and artistic perspectives.

This concentric circle shape can be traced back to the Bauhaus, which the Demaines have extended further by pushing multiple concentric circles together. Their mathematical origami is part of the Museum of Modern Art’s collection and is on view in the exhibition Applied Design through January 2014. As Martin Demaine says, “All our sculptures represent open problems that we don’t understand but we’re trying to understand, visualized using paper folding.”

Read more about the Demaine’s Guggenheim award here. via The Art and Mathematics of Origami | CAST.

 

Reaching for the Better Angels of our Nature – Art Installation by Karah Pino, MAcOM

Reaching for the Better Angels of our Nature - #Artpocalypse @Mind Unwind December 2012 l Installation by Karah Pino

#Artpocalypse @Mind Unwind December 2012 Installation by Karah Pino

I began this piece with the idea that our better nature, the nature of humanity in harmony with the natural world, is just a decision away.  All we have to do is reach for the truth in ourselves.

Artwalk December 13th, 2012 at Mind Unwind Gallery in West Seattle.  “Artpocalypse” happening all day December 21st, 2012

Mixed Media “Chime”delier
Vellum Origami Folded Angels
Oil Paint on Industrial Scrap Plastic sheets
Indian Brass Bells

Installation Photo Gallery:

Roosted in the Angels NestThe Light that Shines WithinAwakening to the Gentle Chimes Our own Clarion Call

Reaching for the Better Angels of our Nature – #Artpocalypse December 2012 Final Installation by Karah Pino

Each angel with bell and blessing $120.  
$20 to the artist and $100 to the Mind Unwind Foundation bringing vital Creative Arts programs into local schools and Community Centers in partnership with other local Creative Arts programs.  The Creative Arts are the foundation of natural learning and critical thinking, building the capacity for developing life skills including math and science .

Origami Artist, Karah Pino graduated from the University of Washington with a BA in Interdisciplinary Visual Art in 1998 with experience in Jewelry and other Metalworking, digital production, graphic design, and paper arts.  She is currently an Artists in Residence at Mind Unwind Gallery,  teaching paper arts to children and meditation to adults with a focus on Origami and Creative Collaborations!