guided meditation

Running as Moving meditation

Vinluan: Moving meditation (Part 2)

By Bobby Vinluan

Sports Psychology

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

THERE are usually distinctive stages in running and the need to listen to your body is recommended.

If running doesn’t feel good in 30 minutes, you may want to stop or you may ask what am I doing here?

Mild feeling of euphoria may also start in 30 minutes of running, tensions may drain away, and the rhythm between your steps and breathing may lull you, and ideas flash in and out of your mind from the periphery of your consciousness.

There are many offbeat ways of relaxing and getting into a meditative mood for running. Joe Henderson, author of the Long-Run Solutions, suggests five steps, which are general rules for running as well as for reaching a meditative state.

“First,” he says, “start your run without an end in sight. It will take 20-30 minutes to pick up the flow, and by then you’ll know how much you can do, if the run goes badly stop and try again tomorrow. Any running is better than none at all. Even a tickle of running add to the pool of fitness. Third, let the pace find itself. You will usually run along the edge between comfort and discomfort. Fourth, run for yourself. Don’t look ahead or behind. And fifth, run for today, don’t compete with yesterday or tomorrow, take pleasure in less than being your best.”

However, even the best runners will miss occasionally a desired and expected outcome. That is because certain things inhibit to facilitate “penetration into one’s inner world” while running. By avoiding these circumstances, i.e. competition, or the obsession with running kilometers, surroundings which focus your attention outside your body, rather than within, or the yakketty-yakking in group runs, and conversation, with someone or yourself, will misdirect your concentration.

Avoiding these circumstances during a run, and by running steady, in a non-tiring pace, and letting your mind spin free, with ideas flowing like water in a stream can make you encourage the meditative state. If we are to understand more the relationship between running and meditation, believe that a sense of euphoria comes with three types of runs, the meditative high from running alone at a reflective pace; the competition high of running fast at the edge of our physical limits; and the “high” of running with friends and fellowship. Try it if running is part of your life.

Free Guided Meditation Videos | Care2 Healthy Living

Have you been wanting to give meditation a try but feel like you don’t have the time? Check out these four videos – ranging from five to 20 minutes in length – to help you fit a little meditation into even the busiest day!

I feel like those days when we don’t have time to care for ourselves are the very days that we need self care the most, and even squeezing five minutes of meditation can help refresh and refocus your mind, so you can better tackle the day’s challenges.

Meditation is something that takes practice, just like yoga, and I’ve found that a guided meditation can help you focus your mind if you’re not used to clearing your head on your own. The meditations we’ve collected here are a good starting point, and once you feel like you have the hang of it, you can set aside time to meditate without the aid of a guide. You can practice in total silence or with some quiet, ambient music instead.

Do you have 5, 10, 15, 0r 20 minutes to spare? Check out the meditation videos on the next few pages tailored to your schedule:

5 Minute Meditation

10 Minute Meditation

15 Minute Meditation

20 Minute Meditation

via Guided Meditation | Care2 Healthy Living.

Free Guided Meditation Tool | Care2 Healthy Living

 

by Becky Stripe

Have you been wanting to get into meditation but didn’t know where to start? There’s an app for that!

Former monk-turned-meditation-guru Andy Puddicombe wants everyone to learn the power of meditation, and his Headspace project is all about helping people learn how to meditate. His Headspace app for iPhone or Android is a powerful tool for anyone looking to learn the basics of meditation and start a regular practice.

If you’re not familiar with Puddicombe, check out his inspiring TED Talk about the power of taking 10 minutes to meditate each day. Or, as he calls it “doing nothing.”

I just started using the app recently, and I’m already loving it! The basic program is a series of ten ten-minute meditation practices, which you go through in order. Each day builds on the previous day’s practice. After that, there are a couple hundred other meditations that you can try in any order that you like, though the additional programs are not free.

Before you do your first meditation, he also walks you through a short series of videos to help you get in the right headspace for your practice. He emphasizes that meditation is a skill, and that you shouldn’t force it. One of the things I’m digging most about this program is that he frequently reminds you that it’s OK if your mind wanders and it’s OK to have conscious thoughts while you’re meditating. The key is noticing when that happens and observing those things without letting them effect you.

I also love the tone of the program. There is no new-agey music, creepy whispering narrator, or strange sound- or voice-effects. He just calmly walks you through each day’s exercise. If you prefer more of a new-age spin on meditation, this app might not be for you.

To give you an idea of what you can expect, check out Day 1 of the ten-part series on page 2!

via Free Guided Meditation Tool | Care2 Healthy Living.