Parenting

Meditation Expert Peter Amato Announced Competition For Meditation In Schools Training – Press Release – Digital Journal

Scranton, PA (PRWEB) May 18, 2013

In an attempt to teach children how to live peacefully and forge a better future, Meditation Master Peter Amato has announced he will bring a meditation program to five deserving schools throughout the country, a $250,000 value in training and materials. At absolutely no cost to the schools.

By making meditation a regular part of the school day, Amato said, young children and teens will be given the tools to reduce stress in their lives, and cope with competition, peer pressure, bullying and the violence all around them. “Key research findings in pilot and current school meditation programs included increases in calm in the classroom, increased attentiveness, increase in a desire to learn along with a strong retention span, and an increase in morale and socialization. Overall, teachers saw a sizeable increase in emotional balance with less behavioral issues and acting out.”

Amato launched a nationwide search for five schools that are interested in starting a meditation program and want to compete to receive the program training free. He is also seeking interested schools to participate on their own as well as individuals, businesses and major corporations to sponsor the program in their communities. The contest ends September 30, 2013. Five winners will be selected by an appointed committee from all eligible entries during the month of October 2013. However, interested schools and sponsors may sign up at any time before or after the contest ends.

To enter the competition, students, teachers, parents or administrators must submit a 200-word essay or three-minute video, in the most creative way possible, on why they deserve to be selected. This can easily be done at Amato’s website http://pathwaytopeace.org/ . The site also offers the capability to become a sponsor or be partnered with a sponsor.

“This is certainly not a one-person project,” Amato admits, “and government funding is not available.” So he is challenging private enterprise to join in and sponsor a school so teachers can be trained to give children a proven tool to help shift the future. “The goal, and the hope, is to have this collaboration become infectious, spreading throughout communities and corporate America so that students from every school in the country, whether public or private, inner city or rural, have the opportunity to benefit from meditative practices.”

Amato knows the program is effective as proven in a multi-year pilot program he developed and implemented under a U.S. Department of Education grant in the Scranton (Pennsylvania) School District. He developed a qualitative research methodology to measure the attributes and benefits of the program. A qualitative case study methodology was then added to develop a mixed method research approach.

Are you willing to accept the challenge? The benefits reach everyone, so sign up now to enter the competition or to get help in getting started at http://pathwaytopeace.org/ .

Peter Amato is a trailblazer who possesses the innate ability to anticipate new paradigms in a changing marketplace, leading him to become a founding partner in several national businesses. Inspired by personal growth and the realization for the need for a higher standard within healthcare, he established the Inner Harmony Wellness Center and the Center for Integrative Medicine which is recognized as one of the first and foremost authentic centers for integrative medicine in the nation. A meditation and yoga master, with certifications from Deepak Chopra, MD Jon Kabat-Zinn, Ph.D. and Yogi Amrit Desai, Peter was the first to introduce a Meditation in School program and publish the results. Peter is the author of the book “Soul Silence” which explores one’s relationship to prayer and meditation, as well as numerous articles on mindfulness. He is currently pursuing his doctorate in mind-body medicine at Saybrook University. A student of many global healing systems, Peter is an in-demand speaker who has motivated audiences across the world.

Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/5/prweb10741211.htm

via Meditation Expert Peter Amato Announced Competition For Meditation In Schools Training – Press Release – Digital Journal.

 

Top Origami Artist to Shed Light on Modern Science of Origami at May 22 Talk

Robert Lang

To many of us, origami, the ancient Japanese art of paper-folding, is an artistic novelty, resulting in a cute miniature crane, frog, elephant or even a boat or a box. But, according to origami master Robert Lang, the algorithms and theorems of origami design have illuminated long-standing mathematical questions and have even solved practical engineering problems.

Lang, who is recognized as one of the foremost origami artists in the world, as well as a pioneer in computational origami and the development of formal design algorithms for folding, will give a free public talk, From Flapping Birds to Space Telescopes: the Modern Science of Origami from 2 to 3:30 p.m., May 22 in Geisel Library’s Science & Engineering Events Room. The lecture is the last in a series of origami-related events–which included origami instruction and screenings of the documentary Between the Folds–sponsored during spring quarter by UC San Diego’s Science & Engineering Library.

At his talk, Lang, who holds a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Caltech, will discuss the techniques used in mathematical origami design–ranging from the abstruse to the highly approachable–and will describe how geometric concepts led to the solution of a broad class of origami folding problems – specifically, the problem of efficiently folding a shape with an arbitrary number and arrangement of flaps. This paved the way for origami designs of mind-blowing complexity and realism, some of which will be examined during Lang’s lecture. As often happens in mathematics, theory originally developed for its own sake has led to some surprising practical applications, including safer airbags, said Lang.

Origami crab and crane

While working at NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Spectra Diode Laboratories, and JDS Uniphase, Lang authored or co-authored over 80 papers and 45 patents on lasers and optoelectronics and has authored, co-authored, or edited 14 books and a CD-ROM on origami. He is a full-time artist and consultant on origami and its applications to engineering problems but keeps his toes in the world of scientific publishing, most recently as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics from 2007–2010. Lang received Caltech’s highest honor, the Distinguished Alumni Award, in 2009 and in 2013 was elected as one of the inaugural Fellows of the American Mathematical Society.

After his lecture, which will include light refreshments, Lang will be on hand to sign copies of his books, two of which–Origami in Action and Origami Design Secrets will be available for purchase.

This event is supported by funding from IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). For more information: http://libguides.ucsd.edu/origami. To register for Lang’s lecture: http://tinyurl.com/lang-lecture-reg.

 

Meditation classes calming young minds | Illawarra Mercury

There seems to be a misconception that kids have it easy.

While they might not be worried about work or money, there are plenty of other things that can stress them out – relationships with their friends, bullying, school work and family issues are high up on the list of things children worry about.

Which is where meditation comes in.

It can help kids find a calm place when they feel anxious and help them to become peaceful after spending an afternoon running around the playground.

Lyn-Maree Fredericks started taking her two daughters to a children’s meditation class 18 months ago, after they started asking questions about her own meditation practices.

Although her eldest daughter no longer attends the classes, she still meditates regularly at home to overcome stress around school, while her nine-year-old daughter Jessie still loves meditating with her friends every Tuesday afternoon.

“Jessie is in tune with the relaxation side of it. I find the conversations I have with her leaving here are usually very clear, like she can go in concerned with what’s happened at school but come out quite bubbly and relaxed,” Fredericks says.

“She seems to find clarity with life. It means she is clearer in the things she wants to do.”

Jessie says she uses meditation to deal with things she worries about at school and to help calm her mind before she falls asleep.

“I like it because it’s fun and very relaxing to do. I like doing the guided meditation the most. Sometimes it’s hard to do just on your own.”

“I do it at night because it helps me get to sleep and with school and calming down with tests that might be coming up.”

Ursula Laughton runs a children’s meditation class and says most kids tell her it assists them when they are feeling anxious about something at school.

“There’s always pressures, even from age five they’ve already started school, and there’s expectations and responsibilities that they have to experience and deal with everyday, so taking this time out, they get the opportunity to be themselves, reflect on what they need and get to know themselves more,” she says.

“I’ve had comments about children being able to go to school more at ease, relating with their peers with more confidence.”

The difference between teaching a child and an adult how to meditate is the level of intellectual engagement they have with the process.

A typical meditation class begins with the children expressing something they are grateful for, followed by some stretches and breathing exercises to calm them down. Laughton then guides her students through some relaxation exercises before taking them into their imagination using visualisation, which lasts between five and 10 minutes depending how old the children are.

via Meditation classes calming young minds | Illawarra Mercury.

 

Pop-Up Adventure Play in the Central District June 1st 10am-5pm free to families!

Pop-Up Adventure Play has been described as a “flash mob play date”

Best characterized as child-directed play where children of all ages play with an abundance of loose parts (e.g. cardboard boxes, fabric, tape, string, etc.) with the support of playmakers who have been trained in community-based playwork by Team Pop-Up Adventure Play.

This event is free to families, sponsored by Play=PeaceSeattle Pop-up Adventure Play and Hopscotch CD. Adults are welcome to play with their kids or chat with other parents and playmakers while enjoying the 2 mile long hopscotch route.  We will be in front of Center Stone  722 18th Ave Seattle

photo(4)

 Pop-Up Adventure Play creates a place where children of all ages and abilities have the opportunity to recognize, explore, and express their natural play instincts with peers, parents, family members, and a community of supportive adults. A Pop-Up Adventure Playground or “Pop-Up” is a free, public celebration of child-directed play, “play that evolves when children choose what to play and make up their own rules for how to play – and translate it in ways that are easily ‘gettable’. We help make play easy and fun… as it should be.” – Anna Housley Juster, an early childhood consultant with popupadventureplay.org. While the children enjoy hours of play, parents and caregivers can join in or sit back and relax.

Contact Name: Mary Alice Long, PhD

Phone: 206/200-4542

Email: maryalice@playequalspeace.com

Meet the Seattle Pop-up-play team:
The Seattle Play=Peace Pop-Up Adventure Play team includes Lead Facilitator, creator of Play=Peace, and Play-based Jungian Therapist, Mary Alice Long, PhD joined by fellow play activists Artist & Meditation instructor Karah Pino, MAcOM, Child and Family Therapist, Tana Adams LICSW-A, Jessica Rowley Lord, Meghan Whitlock LMHCA, and Artist Marcia Ann Wiley to support and nurture the creativity and free play during the event.

Sacred Shadow Studio Update #2: “Vitalize the Mind” wall panels

Artist at work Unwinding her Mind

Artist at work - Karah Pino, MAcOM

Artist at work – Karah Pino, MAcOM

I’m not sure why I insist on using my fingers when working with charcole…they always crack and bleed, but I am getting more savvy about using a Chamois…or paper towel in this case. — at Sacred Shadow Studio for the Mind Unwind June Exhibit.

“Vitalize the Mind” wall panels are 60″inch by 8 feet panels based on a Taoist Talisman from the 7th century.  The two panels will be flanking a permanent meditator carved from a column of light and the  shadow created by it on the wall..

Still need to figure out how to make the wall panels movable so the doors they will be hiding can be accessed easily.

Learn more about the Sacred Shadow Self exhibit,

an interactive art installation including live meditation performances and featuring two youth origami artists inspired by a 2-year-old, two young artists and a wise elder

by reading the complete Artist Statement:

Protein origami | Nature Chemical Biology | Nature Publishing Group

April 29, 2013

Nature Chemical Biology

DNA origami, make room: proteins can be bioengineered to fold up into three-dimensional architectures from one continuous strand, reports work published online this week in Nature Chemical Biology.

DNA origami, in which specific base pairing has been used to design a large variety of structures such as smiley faces, university logos, and boxes, has provided inspiration for scientists hoping to create ‘smart’ materials or simply explore our understanding of the forces that control molecular interactions. Protein assembly has also been studied, but these experiments have only utilized multiple short sequences interacting together to form larger structures.

Roman Jerala and colleagues show that longer protein sequences – in this case, a polypeptide containing 12 helices in a row – can be prompted to fold into designed structures based on specific pairing of the helices. The authors characterize their newly folded tetrahedron with several techniques, including showing that scrambled or shortened sequences no longer form the right shape. As the building blocks that make up proteins are more diverse than those in DNA, this study opens the door for entirely new architectures that may have new functions as well, such as cargo delivery or the creation of artificial catalytic sites.

via Protein origami | Nature Chemical Biology | Nature Publishing Group.

 

Origami Shelter: Instant Flat-Pack Architecture on Demand | WebUrbanist

origamic architecture

Take a structure, strip away all of the non-essentials, and squeeze out every last unused bit of air space, and what do you get? Something a lot like a folded sheet of paper.

origami inspired instant architecture

This folding shelter designed by Doowon Suh is as elementary as it gets – a series of sheets that unfold like origami to form a robust but basic building.

origami example

Like nesting paper cranes, in its most compact form, each module can be stacked on its siblings, making it easy to pack and ship in containers or store until deployed.

origami flat pack buildings

The modules are bare bones for maximum adaptive capability – they can emergency homes or hospital pods, temporary stores or community rooms.

via Origami Shelter: Instant Flat-Pack Architecture on Demand | WebUrbanist.

Origami Invitational – All Youth Origami Artists Welcome to join in the June Exhibit at Mind Unwind Gallery

In celebration of two Featured Youth Origami Artists, the June Exhibition at Mind Unwind Gallery will include an Origami Invitational

All youth origami artists will be welcome to bring in and share their favorite pieces during the West Seattle Artwalk June 13th, 5pm-7pm.

Orange Origami shape

Blindfolded Origami maker

Included in the June exhibition called “The Sacred Shadow Self” will be a seascape of shadows made by large-scale Origami structures including an 11 foot Origami Albatross folded by 3rd grader Cole Durnwirth and an Origami Sea Anemone assembled by 3rd grader Caroline Byrne.

Please RSVP on Facebook or the Contact Form below, so we know how much space to make for sharing!

Video: The Art and Mathematics of Origami | CAST

Congratulations to Erik and Martin Demaine for their recent Guggenheim award!

“One of our growing realizations over the years is that mathematics itself is an art form, and I think that’s what attracted both of us to this area in the first place. [I]t has the same kind of creativity, the same kinds of aesthetics, that you get in art: You want a clean problem to solve, and you want an elegant solution to that problem. Both art and mathematics are about having the right ideas [and] executing those ideas in some convincing way, so in that sense they’re indistinguishable.” — Erik Demaine on the fusion of art and science.The Demaines’ curved-crease sculptures exemplify collaborative, cross-disciplinary exploration.

Finding origami to be a powerful tool to study mathematics, the father-and-son duo explore foldable forms from both mathematical and artistic perspectives.

This concentric circle shape can be traced back to the Bauhaus, which the Demaines have extended further by pushing multiple concentric circles together. Their mathematical origami is part of the Museum of Modern Art’s collection and is on view in the exhibition Applied Design through January 2014. As Martin Demaine says, “All our sculptures represent open problems that we don’t understand but we’re trying to understand, visualized using paper folding.”

Read more about the Demaine’s Guggenheim award here. via The Art and Mathematics of Origami | CAST.