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Pulp Art: Origami Unfolds in the West | Asia Life | The Diplomat

Flickr (x1brett)

Last month, hundreds of paper connoisseurs descended on New York for a convention put on by OrigamiUSA, in celebration of the delicate paper arts of East Asia. The event underscores the West’s growing appreciation for this time-tested art form.

For most, origami (literally, “folding paper”, sans scissors and glue) invokes the quintessential image of a neatly creased crane. A level above this reveals models of other creatures and plants – elephants, flowers, sharks, and scaly dragons, to name a few. However, a quick look online suggests that these more conventional designs are the tip of the iceberg for the 17th century art form.

While Japan is most closely associated with the pulp arts, there is evidence that the Chinese were known to fold paper for art’s sake – as well as burn paper representations of gold nuggets (yuanbao) during funerals. Even European countries Germany, Italy and Spain have their own paper folding traditions traceable to the Moors. But Japan is where the art form really found its home.

“Origami is alive and well in Japan,” Leyla Torres of OrigamiUSA and Origami Spirit told The Diplomat. “There are origami clubs or societies in many parts of Japan.” Among them are the two main associations, the Japan Origami Academic Society (JOAS), formed to cater to the mainly younger proponents of advanced technical folding, and the Nippon Origami Association, which regularly publishes an origami magazine.

While Japan has always been the heart of origami culture, in the 20th century the art was internationalized by a cadre of trailblazers and virtuosos from both Japan and abroad who pushed origami’s boundaries and took it in exciting new directions.

Flickr (scarygami) -- 2Torres continued: “Origami is not in any sense a rare pursuit for adults in Japan. Thanks to the ease of communications and the new media, people who practice origami around the world are in constant connection and feed from each other’s work… Origami has evolved from a traditional pastime into a self-conscious art form thanks to the pioneering work of Akira Yoshizawa (Japan), today considered the father of contemporary origami.”

Alongside Yoshizawa, Torres added the names of artists from Europe and the Americas, such as Miguel de Unamuno and Vicente Solórzano (Spain), Ligia Montoya (Argentina), and Neal Elias and Fred Rohm (U.S.). She also emphasized the influence of the diagramming system co-created by Yoshizawa, Samuel Randlett and Robert Harbin.

Collectively, these artists took the simple act of shaping paper to mindboggling levels of complexity in some cases. Modern forms include no less than the following: icosahedrons; shapes that move, inflate, flap and fly; highly complex objects composed of numerous identical pieces fitted together (“modular origami”); gently curving designs made with dampened paper; miniature pieces that fit easily on a fingertip; and at the farthest end of the evolutionary spectrum, tessellations – many figures joined at the pleats, with no spaces between or overlapping parts.

Some of the most complex examples of folded paper embody what appear to be – and often are in fact – mind-bending mathematical conundrums. Technical origami has picked up where the compass and straight-edge leave off, effectively doubling the cube (solving the Delian problem) and successfully pulling off angle trisection.

Some examples of geometric madness in paper form by artist Kyla McCallum, exhibited in Glasgow this May, can be seen here. Other fantastic origami creation can be seen here, ranging from a tusked mammoth and a toilet made from a single dollar bill to a lemur and even a Minotaur.

In terms of complexity, Torres recommended checking out the works of Robert Lang (US) and Satoshi Kamiya (Japan).

Flickr (scarygami)Of his own intricate designs of moose, scorpions and sundry wildlife, Lang said: “I may spend hours or even days developing an intricate design working out the positions of all the folds, and how those folds interact, and then again hours to days to actually fold the object up.”

An abbreviated list of some other notable contemporary artists named by Torres includes Kunihiko Kasahara (Japan – watch her teach how to build a 4D origami box here), Tomoko Fuse (Japan – well known for her modular origami work), Paul Jackson (Israel), Michael LaFosse (USA), Joseph Wu (Canada), Román Díaz (Uruguay), Angel Morollón (Spain), and author Jun Maekawa (Japan).

“What is important about origami is that it reaches people at all levels of expertise all over the planet,” Torres said. “It is an art in which the final result can be complex, but it can also be the art of capturing the essence of a subject in a few simple folds. Both approaches can be very artistic.”

She added that for experts and beginners alike “the folding process is like a performance and a meditation.”

Pulp Art: Origami Unfolds in the West | Asia Life | The Diplomat.

Geometric origami inspiration | Brooklyn Bride – Modern Wedding Blog

Geometric origami inspiration

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I’ve been spotting geometric origami projects left and right and there’s no better place to use them than in a modern wedding reception. Try a bunch of them as centerpieces for a a table, or hanging overhead as lanterns. Or create a pattern out of paper and adhere them to a wall. There are so many ways to use them and they add a clean, fresh vibe to the event.

Top  centerpieces

Middle left 2D heart hanging  |  Middle right gold hanging 

bottom left hanging lanterns  |  Bottom right hangings

by Brittany Watson Jepsen of The House That Lars Built

Geometric origami inspiration | Brooklyn Bride – Modern Wedding Blog.

 

Penn researchers integrate origami and engineering | Penn Current

The quintessential piece of origami might be a decorative paper crane, but in the hands of an interdisciplinary Penn research team, it could lead to a drug-delivery device, an emergency shelter, or even a space station.

The Penn team is led by Randall Kamien, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the School of Arts & Sciences, and includes Shu Yang, associate professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s departments of Materials Science and Engineering, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.

Collaborating with researchers at Cornell University, the Penn team will share in a $2 million, four-year grant from the National Science Foundation’s Division of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation. The grant is through a program called ODISSEI, or Origami Design For The Integration Of Self-assembling Systems For Engineering Innovation.

The program draws inspiration from the Japanese art of paper folding, but the Penn team suggested adding a variant of the technique, known as kirigami, in which the paper can be cut as well as folded. Allowing for cuts and holes in the material makes it easier to fold rigid, three-dimensional structures.

The Penn team plans to begin by prototyping designs with paper and 3D-printed plastic.

“We want to demonstrate the concept in the macroscale, but once we have a grasp on how the theory and experiment work together—where to introduce cuts and folds—we’ll shrink it down to the microscale,” Yang says.

Kirigami

Finished kirigami configurations in front of the template. Kirigami is a variant of origami that allows cuts as well as folds.

Yang and Kamien have collaborated on similar molecule-manipulating research in the past. Along with Kathleen Stebe, deputy dean for research at Penn Engineering, they developed a technique for getting a layer of liquid crystals to form different patterns of divots or bumps based on nanoscale templates.

These concepts can also be scaled up, enabling applications such as emergency shelters that can be folded flat for transport. Kirigami architecture is particularly attractive for space-based structures, which are free from the size constraints imposed by gravity, but still need to fit into the cargo bays of launch vehicles.

“The thing that’s cool about geometry, is that the Pythagorean theorem works the same for big triangles and little triangles,” Kamien says. “We can build something out of paper, or we can build the same structure much smaller, working with molecules, or much bigger with cloth or metal.”

Penn researchers integrate origami and engineering | Penn Current.

Paper Installation: Meditation as Art at Ryan James Gallery in Bellevue until Wednesday

Wonderful discussion about Meditation as Art and Art as Meditation

Part of the Play and Creativity Series with Mary Alice Long of Play=Peace

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From The Ryan James Gallery Facebook Page:

Installation, discussion and play at Ryan James Gallery in Bellevue.
Photo

Art + Meditation with Artist Karah Pino and in partnership with Play=Peace

Photos: 37

 

Rethinking origami as ‘Folding Paper’ / Sacramento Press

Miri Golan’s “Two Books,” (left) and Vincent Floderer’s “Clitocybe” (right)

If you think of frogs or birds when someone mentions origami, then perhaps you need to visit the new exhibit, “Folding Paper: the Infinite Possibilities of Origami,” at the Crocker Art Museum, where you’ll see some frogs and some birds, but you’ll also see pieces created by artists from around the globe that go far beyond what’s taught in elementary school.

How about a dress that can be worn standing up, and a matching pair of shoes? Each item was created from a single sheet of parchment paper, without making any cuts. If a parchment dress isn’t to your liking, perhaps a red dress created from a more traditional dress fabric will suit you for that special evening out.

Origami inspires clothing and telescopes (Image by: David Alvarez)

What do dresses have to do with origami? Well, as this exhibit shows, the art of folding paper touches many aspects of daily life, including clothing, buildings, maps and even phone designs.

You won’t want to rush through this exhibit because the lighting is as important as each piece. Watch how the shadows play on Bernie Peyton’s “Frog on a Leaf,” which reminded me of a haiku. Move in close, to the left, to the right, then step back and see how the light shifts, allowing some parts to come forward and others to recede.

One of the most important pieces in the exhibit is Miri Golan’s “Two Books,” which have tiny people figures emerging from the Koran and the Torah. The tiny figures, which appear to be worshipping, come together in peace.

As surprising as the parchment dress is the array of materials used to create these objects. While some artists worked with traditional materials, others, like Giang Dinh, chose to use watercolor paper, as Dinh does for his piece “Fly.”

“Fly” by Giang Dinh, 2010, watercolor paper (Image by: David Alvarez)

Spheres created by artists from Poland, Japan and Germany incorporated metallic paper, ticker tape, paper tape and even copy paper, while Robert J. Lang used glassine paper for his piece, “3 7 Hyperbole Limit, Opus 600,” one of few relatively flat pieces in the exhibit.

The tiniest piece in the exhibit is a crane folded from a candy wrapper. Be sure to take time to read about Sadako Sasaki and how she came to fold this crane, if you do not already know her story.

What should you not miss? The film showing speed folding; Lang’s giclee prints of the crease patterns he used in creating “Bull Moose,” “Scorpion,” and “Red-Tailed Hawk”; the story of the impact of origami on science and industry; and the history of origami, including information about Akira Yoshizawa, who became known as Japan’s first origami fine artist.

Robert J. Lang’s “Scorpion” and “Red-Tailed Hawk” and giclee prints of crease patterns. (Image by: David Alvarez)

This exhibit, curated by Meher McArthur, opened Sunday, June 30, and runs through September 29. To complement the exhibit, the Crocker Art Museum is offering several special events for adults and children. Please visit the museum’s website for more information.

Sacramento Press / Rethinking origami as ‘Folding Paper’.

 

Sacred Shadow Self Featuring Youth Origami Artists Cole Durnwirth and Caroline Byrne

I am so excited and honored to be joined by two brilliant young artists this June at Mind Unwind Gallery!

Having the addition of their presentation and origami contribution enriches the exhibit and extends it beyond my own capacity.  The Origami Seascape emphasizes the intention behind The Sacred Shadow Self  to encourage viewers to reach deeper into themselves and remember the excitement and impassioned investigation that is inspired by the instigating sparks of our own passions.  It seems all to easy to forget that vital force of life in our busy lives.

Remembering and sharing that excitement is what I see as my job an an artist.  I feel very lucky and honored to be sharing this time and space with two brilliant young artists also inspired by origami!  Bringing together their contributions into the same wall was magical.  Enjoy!photo 4

Origami Seascape

Cole Durnwirth is a 9 year old origami artist from West Seattle.  He started folding at age 5 after he saw the documentary Between the Folds.  For this exhibit he has contributed “Albatross II” a life-sized 11 ½ foot long origami Albatross folded from one sheet of paper.  A practice sketch is also hanging.
Media:  Art paper.  Classic Origami Construction from a single sheet

Caroline Byrne lives in Seattle, is 9 years old and is in the 3rd grade.  She first became interested in origami in preschool when they made paper hats and fortune tellers.  Then in Kindergarten she was inspired by the 1,000 paper cranes project that the 3rd creates each year.  That Christmas she asked for origami paper and Santa delivered.  Caroline has been experimenting with origami ever since.  Her favorite thing about origami is seeing a flat piece of paper turn into a piece of art.  Her contribution to this installation are sea anemones.  This origami is her own creation and was inspired by origami chrysanthemums.  Caroline also loves experimenting with many different types of materials to create unique works of art.  She hopes to be an artist when she grows up.
Media: Art paper.  Modular Origami Construction with 10, 8 and 6 interlocking sheets.

Karah Pino became interested in origami in the 4th grade when she learned to make boxes at school.  That Christmas she and her family did a factory line, making 100’s of boxes out of old Christmas cards.  After graduating art school in 1998, she began to teach Origami as part of an after school program and was challenged by the excitement of the kids to learn more to teach them.  Her love of origami comes from her enjoyment of mathematics, geometry and engineering expressed in art.  Her contribution to the Origami Wall is a free formed Cloud Maker which produces a cloud shape in its shadow.

You are  invited to appreciate the Origami Seascape through the entire month of June at Mind Unwind Gallery in West Seattle.  Meet the Origami Artists during Artwalk on June 13th from 5-7pm during the Youth Origami Invitational.

Author tells stories with origami | Schools | Warren County News

Topics: Schools
Author tells stories with origami

MAINEVILLE, OH (FOX19) – Students at Little Miami elementary and primary schools learned the ancient art of origami recently when children’s author Christine Petrell Kallevig brought “Storigami” to their buildings.

Kallevig, who has written a number of children’s stories, used paper folding illustrate a number of stories she shared with students in Butlerville, Maineville and Salem Twp. schools. Students learned how to fold paper cranes and even how to make them “flap.”

Kallevig’s visit was sponsored by the PTOs of each building.

Topics: Schools

Author tells stories with origami | Schools | Warren County News.

 

Sacred Shadow Studio Update #4: Layering the Mandala

I looked at  many different shapes, these are just a few I chose to consider for this mandala.

Exploring Mandala Shapes:

Mandala Tests

Mandala Test Shapes

Looking at layering:

Final choice:

Mandala Three Layers

Mandala Three Layers

Detail:

Mandala Detail

Mandala Detail