God

Mediation, for people who can’t meditate

Mediation, for people who can’t meditate

By: Nitin Agarwal on Oct 18, 2013 | 218 Views | 5 Responses

The author is deeply influenced by ‘A Course in Miracles’, ‘The Power of Now’ and ‘Tripura Rahasya’, and gives various suggestions keeping in the mind the learning received from these books.

 

I am unable to meditate. When I sit to meditate, my mind wonders more wildly. I have tried it all but found no benefit. What do I do now?

 

Mediation is a great tool to enlightenment, but it’s not the only one.

 

What are the other ways?

 

If meditation has not worked for you, don’t worry. Try other means to switch off your mind.

Play, dance, sing, run, walk in the woods, eat, take a bath, enjoy sex, work, do anything that you would normally do, but with little caution.

Do what you are doing, but make a conscious effort to be fully involved in the doing.

 

I don’t understand this..

 

Observe your mind. See how it wonders uselessly. The mind will always tell you that what you are thinking is of extreme importance. Most of the time it will tell you that something has gone wrong in the past and you will have to face the consequence in future or get it right in future.

 

Is that not the right way? Should we not be introspecting and take necessary steps to improve our future?

 

All you are thinking about is the past or the future. Introspection is fine, but just see how much time is required for the same.

Constantly thinking about the past or the future, you miss the present.

Focus on the present, and do what you are doing. This is a 24 hour meditative state. You won’t need to sit and close your eyes and try to meditate.

 

Is it as good as meditation?

 

In meditation, you give a certain dedicated time. Being in the present, is taking benefits of meditation, while doing all your daily activities.

 

Will there be any spiritual progress?                     

 

God resides in a quiet mind. Meditation is a way to achieve a quiet mind. Being in the present is another way of keeping your mind quiet.

Study Shows How Prayer, Meditation Affect Brain Activity (VIDEO)

Go to video: Study Shows How Prayer, Meditation Affect Brain Activity (VIDEO).

How do prayer and meditation affect brain activity? Dr. Andrew Newberg, MD, is the Director of Research at the Myrna Brind Center for Integrative Medicine at Thomson Jefferson University Hospital and Medical College, and he has studied the neuroscientific effect of religious and spiritual experiences for decades.

In a video that recently aired on “Through the Wormhole” narrated by Morgan Freeman on the TV channel Science, Dr. Newberg explains that to study the effect of meditation and prayer on the brain, he injects his subjects with a harmless radioactive dye while they are deep in prayer / meditation. The dye migrates to the parts of the brain where the blood flow is the strongest, i.e,. to the most active part of the brain.

The image below compares brain activity at rest and while the subject (a Presbyterian minister is shown in the video) is in deep prayer.

prayer meditation brain

The red part indicates greater activity, and in this case, increased activity is observed in the frontal lobes and the language area of the brain. This is the part of the brain that activates during conversation, and Dr. Newberg believes that for the brain, praying to God in the Judeo-Christian tradition is similar to talking to people. “When we study Buddhist meditation where they are visualizing something, we might expect to see a change or increased activity in the visual part of the brain,” Dr. Newberg said.

While observing atheists meditating or “contemplating God,” Dr. Newberg did not observe any of the brain activity in the frontal lobe that he observed in religious people. The image below compares brain activity at rest and while the subject is in deep meditation.

prayer meditation brain

Dr. Newberg concludes that all religions create neurological experiences, and while God is unimaginable for atheists, for religious people, God is as real as the physical world. “So it helps us to understand that at least when they [religious people] are describing it to us, they are really having this kind of experience… This experience is at least neurologically real.”

via Study Shows How Prayer, Meditation Affect Brain Activity (VIDEO).