How Athletes Can Benefit From Meditation – Press Release – Digital Journal

PHILADELPHIA, PA, July 04, 2013

Anne Germain, a spiritual medium, philanthropist, and human resources expert, uses her talents to help cope with loss and regain confidence.

Confidence, for athletes, is everything. A recent article on the Huffington Post outlines a few key factors why meditation is more than beneficial for athletes. Basic meditation, according to Germain, allows people to cope with tragedy and loss. Loss, a big part of being an athlete, is no different. Loss obsession is common among athletes. A bad season, a few interceptions, or a couple bad putts can really affect an athlete’s performance in every sport imaginable.

Whether it’s running, swimming, climbing, wrestling, or spelunking, meditation helps athletes reduce obsessive thinking and “reset” their minds when it comes to overcoming a bad streak. Most of all, meditation helps athletes focus. Sports depend on focus and staying concentrated through quarters and miles. The article cites a study that shows increased focused via meditation — focus, of course, relates to all manner of activities and athletics alike. It also helps with fear. For instance, a big game or challenging team may cause hesitation in athletes and motivate them to dig deep into their minds. “Fear, focus, and pain are easily manageable with a strict meditation regime,” Anne Germain says. ”

A lot of injuries, for example, are partially mental. Whether it’s a golf swing or pitch, certain hitches in an athlete’s mental state can hinder performance. Mediation helps flush out mental barriers.” The article states that meditation also strengthens immune systems and makes athletes more resilient. Athletes are not able to perform sick or injured. Professional, guided meditation, according to Germain, helps mentally prepare them for anything. The fear/failure obstacle is constantly present for athletes, too, and meditation can help athletes detach from negative thoughts and focus on success. ”

Good mediation can put an athlete in the game at that moment,” Germain says. “There’s pre-mediation, like taking a few moments in a locker room to mentally prepare and cleanse your mind, then there’s on-field mediation. On-field meditation is as simple as taking a few deep breaths, closing your eyes, and picturing the task at hand.” Stress is a danger for everyone. Kids, work, field goals, bills — stress factors are omnipresent every day, but studies have shown mediation to reduce stress. It is also a factor with maintaining emotional stability. Moody people often lack self-control, which mediation actively helps. Sleep is a factor, as well, and relates directly to stress and mood swings. Meditation helps all three aspects of everyday life, allowing athletes and non-athletes alike to perform better at daily tasks. The article then goes on to talk about coaches.

“Having an outside source allows an athlete to deal with blind spots,” Anne Germain says. “Coaches are good for this, but meditation and active thinking can help athletes coach themselves through the hardest tasks.” Mediation, while not entirely accepted by athletes as a whole yet, is a viable approach when speed, power, and performance mean everything. Anne Germain sees the advantages, and encourages everyone to give it a try. ABOUT: Anne Germain is a spiritual medium and human resources professional. Currently living in the United Kingdom, she helps people find closure and peace in the face of tragedy. She has spent a lot of time with various police departments.

Anne Germain Looks At How Athletes Can Benefit From Meditation – Press Release – Digital Journal.

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