Origami

Rethinking origami as ‘Folding Paper’ / Sacramento Press

Miri Golan’s “Two Books,” (left) and Vincent Floderer’s “Clitocybe” (right)

If you think of frogs or birds when someone mentions origami, then perhaps you need to visit the new exhibit, “Folding Paper: the Infinite Possibilities of Origami,” at the Crocker Art Museum, where you’ll see some frogs and some birds, but you’ll also see pieces created by artists from around the globe that go far beyond what’s taught in elementary school.

How about a dress that can be worn standing up, and a matching pair of shoes? Each item was created from a single sheet of parchment paper, without making any cuts. If a parchment dress isn’t to your liking, perhaps a red dress created from a more traditional dress fabric will suit you for that special evening out.

Origami inspires clothing and telescopes (Image by: David Alvarez)

What do dresses have to do with origami? Well, as this exhibit shows, the art of folding paper touches many aspects of daily life, including clothing, buildings, maps and even phone designs.

You won’t want to rush through this exhibit because the lighting is as important as each piece. Watch how the shadows play on Bernie Peyton’s “Frog on a Leaf,” which reminded me of a haiku. Move in close, to the left, to the right, then step back and see how the light shifts, allowing some parts to come forward and others to recede.

One of the most important pieces in the exhibit is Miri Golan’s “Two Books,” which have tiny people figures emerging from the Koran and the Torah. The tiny figures, which appear to be worshipping, come together in peace.

As surprising as the parchment dress is the array of materials used to create these objects. While some artists worked with traditional materials, others, like Giang Dinh, chose to use watercolor paper, as Dinh does for his piece “Fly.”

“Fly” by Giang Dinh, 2010, watercolor paper (Image by: David Alvarez)

Spheres created by artists from Poland, Japan and Germany incorporated metallic paper, ticker tape, paper tape and even copy paper, while Robert J. Lang used glassine paper for his piece, “3 7 Hyperbole Limit, Opus 600,” one of few relatively flat pieces in the exhibit.

The tiniest piece in the exhibit is a crane folded from a candy wrapper. Be sure to take time to read about Sadako Sasaki and how she came to fold this crane, if you do not already know her story.

What should you not miss? The film showing speed folding; Lang’s giclee prints of the crease patterns he used in creating “Bull Moose,” “Scorpion,” and “Red-Tailed Hawk”; the story of the impact of origami on science and industry; and the history of origami, including information about Akira Yoshizawa, who became known as Japan’s first origami fine artist.

Robert J. Lang’s “Scorpion” and “Red-Tailed Hawk” and giclee prints of crease patterns. (Image by: David Alvarez)

This exhibit, curated by Meher McArthur, opened Sunday, June 30, and runs through September 29. To complement the exhibit, the Crocker Art Museum is offering several special events for adults and children. Please visit the museum’s website for more information.

Sacramento Press / Rethinking origami as ‘Folding Paper’.

 

Advertisements

Sacred Shadow Self Featuring Youth Origami Artists Cole Durnwirth and Caroline Byrne

I am so excited and honored to be joined by two brilliant young artists this June at Mind Unwind Gallery!

Having the addition of their presentation and origami contribution enriches the exhibit and extends it beyond my own capacity.  The Origami Seascape emphasizes the intention behind The Sacred Shadow Self  to encourage viewers to reach deeper into themselves and remember the excitement and impassioned investigation that is inspired by the instigating sparks of our own passions.  It seems all to easy to forget that vital force of life in our busy lives.

Remembering and sharing that excitement is what I see as my job an an artist.  I feel very lucky and honored to be sharing this time and space with two brilliant young artists also inspired by origami!  Bringing together their contributions into the same wall was magical.  Enjoy!photo 4

Origami Seascape

Cole Durnwirth is a 9 year old origami artist from West Seattle.  He started folding at age 5 after he saw the documentary Between the Folds.  For this exhibit he has contributed “Albatross II” a life-sized 11 ½ foot long origami Albatross folded from one sheet of paper.  A practice sketch is also hanging.
Media:  Art paper.  Classic Origami Construction from a single sheet

Caroline Byrne lives in Seattle, is 9 years old and is in the 3rd grade.  She first became interested in origami in preschool when they made paper hats and fortune tellers.  Then in Kindergarten she was inspired by the 1,000 paper cranes project that the 3rd creates each year.  That Christmas she asked for origami paper and Santa delivered.  Caroline has been experimenting with origami ever since.  Her favorite thing about origami is seeing a flat piece of paper turn into a piece of art.  Her contribution to this installation are sea anemones.  This origami is her own creation and was inspired by origami chrysanthemums.  Caroline also loves experimenting with many different types of materials to create unique works of art.  She hopes to be an artist when she grows up.
Media: Art paper.  Modular Origami Construction with 10, 8 and 6 interlocking sheets.

Karah Pino became interested in origami in the 4th grade when she learned to make boxes at school.  That Christmas she and her family did a factory line, making 100’s of boxes out of old Christmas cards.  After graduating art school in 1998, she began to teach Origami as part of an after school program and was challenged by the excitement of the kids to learn more to teach them.  Her love of origami comes from her enjoyment of mathematics, geometry and engineering expressed in art.  Her contribution to the Origami Wall is a free formed Cloud Maker which produces a cloud shape in its shadow.

You are  invited to appreciate the Origami Seascape through the entire month of June at Mind Unwind Gallery in West Seattle.  Meet the Origami Artists during Artwalk on June 13th from 5-7pm during the Youth Origami Invitational.

Author tells stories with origami | Schools | Warren County News

Topics: Schools
Author tells stories with origami

MAINEVILLE, OH (FOX19) – Students at Little Miami elementary and primary schools learned the ancient art of origami recently when children’s author Christine Petrell Kallevig brought “Storigami” to their buildings.

Kallevig, who has written a number of children’s stories, used paper folding illustrate a number of stories she shared with students in Butlerville, Maineville and Salem Twp. schools. Students learned how to fold paper cranes and even how to make them “flap.”

Kallevig’s visit was sponsored by the PTOs of each building.

Topics: Schools

Author tells stories with origami | Schools | Warren County News.

 

Sacred Shadow Studio Update #4: Layering the Mandala

I looked at  many different shapes, these are just a few I chose to consider for this mandala.

Exploring Mandala Shapes:

Mandala Tests

Mandala Test Shapes

Looking at layering:

Final choice:

Mandala Three Layers

Mandala Three Layers

Detail:

Mandala Detail

Mandala Detail

Top Origami Artist to Shed Light on Modern Science of Origami at May 22 Talk

Robert Lang

To many of us, origami, the ancient Japanese art of paper-folding, is an artistic novelty, resulting in a cute miniature crane, frog, elephant or even a boat or a box. But, according to origami master Robert Lang, the algorithms and theorems of origami design have illuminated long-standing mathematical questions and have even solved practical engineering problems.

Lang, who is recognized as one of the foremost origami artists in the world, as well as a pioneer in computational origami and the development of formal design algorithms for folding, will give a free public talk, From Flapping Birds to Space Telescopes: the Modern Science of Origami from 2 to 3:30 p.m., May 22 in Geisel Library’s Science & Engineering Events Room. The lecture is the last in a series of origami-related events–which included origami instruction and screenings of the documentary Between the Folds–sponsored during spring quarter by UC San Diego’s Science & Engineering Library.

At his talk, Lang, who holds a Ph.D. in Applied Physics from Caltech, will discuss the techniques used in mathematical origami design–ranging from the abstruse to the highly approachable–and will describe how geometric concepts led to the solution of a broad class of origami folding problems – specifically, the problem of efficiently folding a shape with an arbitrary number and arrangement of flaps. This paved the way for origami designs of mind-blowing complexity and realism, some of which will be examined during Lang’s lecture. As often happens in mathematics, theory originally developed for its own sake has led to some surprising practical applications, including safer airbags, said Lang.

Origami crab and crane

While working at NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Spectra Diode Laboratories, and JDS Uniphase, Lang authored or co-authored over 80 papers and 45 patents on lasers and optoelectronics and has authored, co-authored, or edited 14 books and a CD-ROM on origami. He is a full-time artist and consultant on origami and its applications to engineering problems but keeps his toes in the world of scientific publishing, most recently as the editor-in-chief of the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics from 2007–2010. Lang received Caltech’s highest honor, the Distinguished Alumni Award, in 2009 and in 2013 was elected as one of the inaugural Fellows of the American Mathematical Society.

After his lecture, which will include light refreshments, Lang will be on hand to sign copies of his books, two of which–Origami in Action and Origami Design Secrets will be available for purchase.

This event is supported by funding from IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). For more information: http://libguides.ucsd.edu/origami. To register for Lang’s lecture: http://tinyurl.com/lang-lecture-reg.

 

Sacred Shadow Studio Update #2: “Vitalize the Mind” wall panels

Artist at work Unwinding her Mind

Artist at work - Karah Pino, MAcOM

Artist at work – Karah Pino, MAcOM

I’m not sure why I insist on using my fingers when working with charcole…they always crack and bleed, but I am getting more savvy about using a Chamois…or paper towel in this case. — at Sacred Shadow Studio for the Mind Unwind June Exhibit.

“Vitalize the Mind” wall panels are 60″inch by 8 feet panels based on a Taoist Talisman from the 7th century.  The two panels will be flanking a permanent meditator carved from a column of light and the  shadow created by it on the wall..

Still need to figure out how to make the wall panels movable so the doors they will be hiding can be accessed easily.

Learn more about the Sacred Shadow Self exhibit,

an interactive art installation including live meditation performances and featuring two youth origami artists inspired by a 2-year-old, two young artists and a wise elder

by reading the complete Artist Statement:

Protein origami | Nature Chemical Biology | Nature Publishing Group

April 29, 2013

Nature Chemical Biology

DNA origami, make room: proteins can be bioengineered to fold up into three-dimensional architectures from one continuous strand, reports work published online this week in Nature Chemical Biology.

DNA origami, in which specific base pairing has been used to design a large variety of structures such as smiley faces, university logos, and boxes, has provided inspiration for scientists hoping to create ‘smart’ materials or simply explore our understanding of the forces that control molecular interactions. Protein assembly has also been studied, but these experiments have only utilized multiple short sequences interacting together to form larger structures.

Roman Jerala and colleagues show that longer protein sequences – in this case, a polypeptide containing 12 helices in a row – can be prompted to fold into designed structures based on specific pairing of the helices. The authors characterize their newly folded tetrahedron with several techniques, including showing that scrambled or shortened sequences no longer form the right shape. As the building blocks that make up proteins are more diverse than those in DNA, this study opens the door for entirely new architectures that may have new functions as well, such as cargo delivery or the creation of artificial catalytic sites.

via Protein origami | Nature Chemical Biology | Nature Publishing Group.

 

Origami Shelter: Instant Flat-Pack Architecture on Demand | WebUrbanist

origamic architecture

Take a structure, strip away all of the non-essentials, and squeeze out every last unused bit of air space, and what do you get? Something a lot like a folded sheet of paper.

origami inspired instant architecture

This folding shelter designed by Doowon Suh is as elementary as it gets – a series of sheets that unfold like origami to form a robust but basic building.

origami example

Like nesting paper cranes, in its most compact form, each module can be stacked on its siblings, making it easy to pack and ship in containers or store until deployed.

origami flat pack buildings

The modules are bare bones for maximum adaptive capability – they can emergency homes or hospital pods, temporary stores or community rooms.

via Origami Shelter: Instant Flat-Pack Architecture on Demand | WebUrbanist.